Men's Addicts
Guns

Potentially Rare Colt AR-15 Rifles Found At A Gun Show

I think that we have all been in the position where we see something at a gun show that stands out as really rare or interesting, but just don’t have enough information to act on it. Even the internet can fall flat sometimes, this was one of those cases. I don’t know if I would come off of $15,000 for a non NFA AR-15 with nothing more than a promised letter from Colt to verify the rifle’s legitimacy. I am sure that the seller is an upstanding guy and I understand that Colt is currently working on those letters, so verification is coming. When I called the Colt archives they were not willing to make any statement other than “those serial numbers sound like how we would serialize”. I guess verbal verification of whether or not a rifle left the factory in that condition is not allowed by archive employees.

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The photos do a great job of outlining what each rifle is, and its price at the gun show. I am nowhere near a Colt expert but I am sure that someone that reads the blog might be. If you happen to be that expert that can tell us more about the rifles, please let us know.

Hat tip to Vhyrus for the photos.  

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Patrick is a Staff Writer for The Firearm Blog and works in the shooting sports industry. He is an avid recreational shooter and a verified gun nerd. With a life long passion for shooting he has love for all types of firearms, especially handguns and the AR-15platform.

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Guns

Defensive Gun Use of the Day: Dean Weingarten’s Friend

A friend of mine had a defensive gun use (DGU) a few days ago. Not the kind you see reported in the news, but a DGU nonetheless. He’d parked a bike near the front door of his home, affixed to a metal chair with a decent cable lock. His dog started to bark at the door, in the middle of the day, during the week. There was no knock or doorbell ring. My friend accessed his house gun, a S&W N-frame model 28 he’d converted to .45 ACP. The security door was locked. He opened the inner door with his left hand, the revolver in his right. In the entryway stood a 16 to 18-year-old young man with a shaved head and tattoos down his neck. My friend hadn’t seen him in the neighborhood before. The young man was studying the bike, the lock, and the chair. My friend held the revolver in the attitude shown in the picture above. You do not see more of him because he wishes to remain anonymous. In the actual event, he was in the doorway, visible through the locked security door.

In fluent Spanish, he asked, “May I help you?”

The tattooed youth looked up. He didn’t say anything. My friend said that he then did a very credible 100 yard dash. My friend did not pursue. There was no reason to do so.

He never pointed the pistol at the youth. He never threatened anyone. He never reported the incident to police. What was there to report? No crime had been committed, except perhaps trespassing.

In Arizona, you are allowed to threaten deadly force to prevent trespassing. As the young man immediately left the property, it’s unlikely a judge or jury would convict him of trespassing. My friend had only asked him if he needed help.

This is a good approximation of the “typical” DGU. No shots fired. The mere presence of the firearm defused the situation. If no firearm were present, the youth might have been emboldened to further action. As it was, there was no physical confrontation. It appears that a guilty conscience (or the sight of Springfield’s finest) was sufficient to command flight.

It’s not hard to believe that such incidents occur hundreds of thousand of times a year, as noted by the CDC in 2013 (pdf):

Almost all national survey estimates indicate that defensive gun uses by victims are at least as common as offensive uses by criminals, with estimates of annual uses ranging from about 500,000 to more than 3 million (Kleck, 2001a), in the context of about 300,000 violent crimes involving firearms in 2008 (BJS, 2010).

There is no incentive — actually a fairly strong disincentive — to report this kind of non-newsworthy incident. In fact, there’s a small but real potential that involving authorities would bring trouble down on the homeowner. Case closed.

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Guns

Who Needs a Double Barreled Shotgun when You Can Get a 6 Barreled Shotgun?

We all have a love for our shotguns. For good reason, they are one of the best weapons to have for home defense. Plus they are almost as customizable as our AR-15 rifles. Have you ever shot a double barreled shotgun? What about 6 barreled shotgun? Now were talking some serious fire power. It was only a few weeks ago that Matt from Demolition Ranch and Richard Ryan from Full Mag came up with the Quad-barrel shotgun. Granted it was nothing more than a DP-12 with a couple Remington 870s strapped to the side.

It was a fun little gag, but they thought bigger. After talking a distributor into sending him a couple more DP-12s, Matt created the triple-double.

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Guns

Heizer’s Pocket AK and Pocket AR–7.62×39 and .223 Hand Cannon Review

If you have clicked into this review, I bet you’re thinking one of two things–either you think the idea of a mouse gun firing a .223 round is bad ass, or you’re thinking it is a bad idea. Well we’ve been hammering our hands for two weeks now and are here to settle the score. Is the rocket-in-your-pocket a good idea, or just a gimmick? Some guns are so iconic that they need no contextualization. The 1911, for example, is what it is. I can write a review of one without explaining its taxonomy in graphic detail. But not the Heizer. This one deserves some ink on its origins. Single-shot, break action pistols are nothing new. As long as guns have had break actions, there have been single shot break action pistols. Yet almost all of them are antiquated designs. Not the Heizer. The fundamentals of this gun are different.

This is not a derringer, exactly—though it fits in that idiom. It is a super-flat (.7”) gun that is designed to provide a last-ditch option for those in need of self-defense. The frame is steel, and the gun itself weighs just a bit more than your typical .380 pocket pistol. That’s to be expected from a gun designed to handle the energy of a .223 or a 7.62×39.

The thin design is accomplished by forming the frame in two distinct halves that are then bolted together. The frame can accommodate .45 Colt, .410, 7.62×39 and .223 barrels. Changing barrels is easy–just push out the pin and swap barrels. The additional barrels sell for $159 (for the .410 and .223) and $199 for the 7.62×39 (which only comes in ported) and the ported .223.

Pocket rocket.

Pocket rocket.

 

Buy one on GunsAmerica: https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=heizer

 

Heizer PAK1 PAR1 31

 

7.62x39

7.62×39

.223

.223

PAK1

Chambered: 7.62×39
Weight: 23 oz
Height: 3 7/8 inches
Width: .7 inches
Length: 6 3/8 inches
Finish: Black or Silver
MSRP: $449.00 (with porting)
Velocity: 1,200 FPS
USA Aerospace Stainless Steel Frame and Barrel

PAR1

Chambered: .223
Weight: 23 oz
Height: 3 7/8 inches
Width: .7 inches
Length: 6 3/8 inches
Finish: Black or Silver
MSRP: $399.00 (without porting)
Velocity: 1,400 FPS
USA Aerospace Stainless Steel Frame and Barrel

When the rounds were loaded, the gun fired. There was only one type of round that wouldn’t fire, and it was a steel-cased 7.62×39 round that had a hard primer. The indention on the strike was fine, it simply wouldn’t pop. None of that batch would. I’d grabbed a few AK mags from my stash without considering what might be in them, and one particular make wouldn’t fire. No matter how many times the pin struck the primers, they all failed. Every other round worked flawlessly.

Can anyone identify the make of these 7.62x39s? They've got some hard ass primers. Check out the dent in the one on top. They'll pop from an an AK, but not from a PAK1.

Can anyone identify the make of these 7.62x39s? They’ve got some hard-ass primers. Check out the dent in the one on top. They’ll pop from an an AK, but not from a PAK1.

SHOOTING

Shooting the .223 is a breeze. It is as easy, or maybe even softer on the hand than your typical .380. I’d put it right up there with the recoil from a Kel-Tec P3AtT, and below that of the Beretta Pico, which kicks like my first wife.

Easy to aim.

Easy to aim.

Hardly any muzzle rise.

Hardly any muzzle rise.

The 7.62×39, though, isn’t fun. I did my part for science and pulled the trigger on 30 or more of these. And I hated every pull. I’m going to say that’s it akin to shooting a steel framed .44 Magnum. It pops and stings. The recoil hit the web of my hand and lingered in that swell of muscle below my thumb. Sam, who also helped out with this review, felt it in the bones in his palm. About four days after we’d done most of the shooting, he sent me a text asking if I could still feel it. I couldn’t–but he was still sore.

Driving the gun to the target. Like ripping off a bandaid.

Driving the gun to the target. Like ripping off a band-aid.

The recoil drives straight back.

The recoil drives straight back.

So it isn’t fun. So what?! This isn’t a rimfire. It isn’t a gun you’d used to teach someone how to shoot. It is meant to serve one purpose. And when your adrenaline is pumping, as it would be when you would use a PAK1 for self-defense, I doubt you’ll even notice the kick.

ACCURACY

So how well did we do with these monsters? As the section above might imply, shooting the .223 was easier than shooting the 7.62×39. When you are flinching like a mad man becasue all you can focus on is the hand-shock that’s about to come, your shot placement suffers. But the PAK1 is still easy to aim and hits were consistent.

7.62x39 in the black. Mostly.

7.62×39 in the black. Mostly.

Don't shoot the gun like this if you don't have to. The porting directs gasses up and out.

Don’t shoot the gun like this if you don’t have to. The porting directs gasses up and out.

Shooting from about 5 feet from the target.

Shooting about 5 feet from the target.

I found myself pulling from the pocket and punching the gun out. At the end of this extension, I’d squeeze the whole gun in my fist. At contact distances, that would be devastating. From 5 feet, and 10 feet, and even 15 feet I could get effective placement on a torso sized target. And, as I’m about to show, precise placement is possible–if you can get over the anticipation of recoil.

One dead-on shot from 15 yards.

One dead-on shot from 15 yards.

From 10 feet.

From 10 feet.

Sam's shot from 10 feet with the PAR1, aimed at the #2.

Sam’s shot from 10 feet with the PAR1, aimed at the #2.

The PAR1, which was easy to shoot, grouped incredibly well fro such a small gun. Check out these images.

After I’d done all of the realistic testing, I backed out to 15 yards and took a coupe of shots. I was most pleased. I’d expected erratic shot placement at best, but the PAR1 is spot-on. I wish all of the pocket guns I shoot were this easy to make pin-point hits with.

FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO REALLY WANT TO GEEK OUT…

Let’s talk numbers. The barrels on these two measure in at 3.75”. That’s measured in the typical manner of closing the barrel, running a post to the breech face, and measuring how far in it extends.

3.75” barrel…. That’s measuring how you would measure an automatic, or a rifle or shotgun. A good bit of that distance is taken up by the rounds themselves. A typical .223 comes in at 2.26”. The baseline for 7.62×39 is 2.2” So you can do the math as well as I can—maybe better. Assuming the rifling starts somewhere around where the bullet lines up with the barrel, this gives you about 1.49” of good rifling with the .223, and 1.55 with the 7.62×39.

The rifling on the PAK1.

The rifling on the PAK1.

The PAR1's rifling is a bit deeper.

The PAR1’s rifling is a bit deeper.

These barrels aren’t that short, of course—the official 3.75 measurement still holds—but you don’t have much rifling to stabilize the round. What this means is that you’ll see a decrease in accuracy at distance (which completely misses the point of these guns). It also means that the rounds may tumble. We saw some wicked keyholes from the 55 grain .223s. Those bullets were punching paper sideways. That’s good news for terminal ballistics, as it will leave a more jagged wound and dump more energy in the intended target.

The PAR1 clocked in close to 1,100 FPS.

The PAR1 clocked in close to 1,100 FPS.

And while we’re on the subject… let’s talk velocity. The .223 is effective—or most effective, rather—when traveling fast. Fast, in this case, is a relative term. The 7.62×39 is also a fast round, though it sacrifices some serious speed for its extra mass.

From an 16” .223 barrel, you can expect speeds near the 3,000 FPS mark. Heavier rounds will be slower, and lighter rounds more zippy. The Heizer spits out 55 grain .223 bullets at close to 1,100 FPS. That’s a serious decline, but the result could still be effective.

Let’s do a bit of comparison.

  • A 55 gr .223 traveling 3,000 FPS has 1,099 foot-pounds of energy.
  • A 55 gr .223 traveling at 1,100 FPS has 148 foot-pounds.
  • From a 16” AK, the 123 grain 7.62×39 should hit somewhere near 2,300 FPS. That’s 1,445 foot-pounds.
  • From the PAK1, that same 123 grain projectile was traveling closer to 900 FPS. 221 foot-pounds.
  • A 40 gr Eley Match .22 LR fired from a 5” Smith & Wesson clocks near 950 FPS. That’s 80 foot-pounds.
  • A 115 grain 9mm fired from a 3” barrel (1075 FPS) has 295 foot-pounds of energy.
  • A 185 grain .45 ACP fired from a 3” barrel (900 FPS) has 333 foot-pounds of energy.
  • A 90 grain .380 fired from a 3” barrel (1,000 FPS) has 200 foot-pounds of energy.

Foot-Pounds of energy are just one measurement we can look at. They serve to help show how the variables (in this case bullet weight and muzzle velocity) combine to determine the efficacy of a given caliber in a given design. How the bullet performs once it hits the target is also crucial. There are numerous bullet designs for both the .223 and the 7.62×39, so choose wisely. We’ll be running some gel tests soon and will bring back the results.

CRITICISMS

Did I mention the hand bite? This thing will—if you aren’t prepared—leave you wondering about your life choices. It can hurt. The 7.62 x 39, even with the ported barrel, was not easy to shoot. After more than 100 rounds (mixed .223 and 7.62×39) through the gun, I’m ready to do a few rimfire reviews.

I’d like to note, though, that I would trade some pain in my hand for the protection this gun can provide in a pinch. No questions asked.

The other criticism has more to do with how the gun runs. All of the 7.62×39 ejected fine. When you pulled the latch back, the barrel popped open. At times, I did have to reach in to tug the round from the chamber—but most of the empties were pushed out far enough for me to pull them out. This is a single shot. There’s no easy way to do speed reloads, though that’s hardly the point.

And the .223? Not as easy. The pressure pooched out some primers and the gun would lock up, momentarily. This could be a lubrication issue, as we ran it hard and didn’t bother greasing it up as we went.

Is that a deal breaker? Hardly. This isn’t an automatic. It isn’t a revolver. The round leaving the gun is what’s important. I can’t imagine a scenario that would require a speed-reload (at least not one that would be filled by this gun to begin with).

The porting helps tame recoil.

The porting helps tame recoil.

THINK OF IT LIKE THIS

As I researched this article, I kept finding people on the internet willing to dismiss this design outright. The Pocket AR and Pocket AK are, they said, novelties. That’s it. There’s never a practical purpose for a gun like this.

Bogus.

Is it s a novelty? Yes. I know this because I picked it up at my FFL, an old fashioned gun store, where several people took turns holding it and fiddling with the controls. At the range, the Heizer received the same attention. People like to play with it. The idea of running a rifle round through a pistol makes some folks curious.

But I see something more. This is a great backup. I typically carry a compact 9mm, one with an ample supply of ammunition in its magazine (and the spare I also carry). There is no way that this would replace that. But there are times that I can’t carry a double-stack 9mm. I typically rely on a single-stack .380. This gun would fit nicely in the same pockets that one does. It would also be a great truck gun. This would fit easily in the console of any car. So when you sit down on your holstered carry gun, you still have something within reach.

The Liberator.

The Liberator.

And I think the Heizer is the modern equivalent of The Liberator. The iconic pressed metal guns were dropped behind the lines for the French Resistance and anyone else who needed a gun. The idea was you use the cheap gun in an improvisational fashion to get another gun. One well equipped Kraut could fall to a Liberator, and his guns could be used to stay in the fight.

Having one of these in .223 and 7.62×39 (the two most common military calibers in the world we live in) could be a solid option for the survival minded, too. The Heizer isn’t really meant to be used to to get another gun, but it offer a fighting chance in a made-for-television scenario.

However you look at it, the gun makes an impression. The Heizer is loud. It also has a tendency to spit fire. Between the assault on the senses provided by the deafening crack, and the potentially blinding flash of powder, and the impact of the round itself hitting home–the gun is much more than a novelty.

Prices start just north of $400. I’d highly suggest one frame and all of the barrels. We’ll get to ballistic testing soon, and I hope to get the .410 barrel in there, too, to see what it can do.

That front sight is just a nubbin.

That front sight is just a nubbin.

The sight radius is pushed to the limit.

The sight radius is pushed to the limit.

The frame of the Heizer accepts barrels in multiple calibers.

The frame of the Heizer accepts barrels in multiple calibers.

Break action.

Break action.

The pocket pistol has mass. 23 ounces, empty.

The pocket pistol has mass. 23 ounces, empty.

Heizer.

Heizer.

The trigger pull is heavy, as it should be for a pocket gun.

The trigger pull is heavy, as it should be for a pocket gun–topping the scale at 10 pounds.

Big round. Little gun. Practical and fun.

Big round. Little gun. Practical and fun.

Guns

Take a trip back in time through the gun ads of the good ol days (18 PHOTOS)

Hold your breath and wish for these prices as reflected in this 1961 GUNS magazine ad. An anti-tank gun for $98.50? $9.99 Mosins! Flip through an old magazine from yesteryear and you will come across deals that you could only dream of today. Sure, inflation is a beast and one could argue that the $9.99 Mosin Model 91 for sale in 1961when adjusted for today’s prices is $80, but just go ahead and try to find transferable Slothurn or Boys anti-tank guns for sale today for less than four figures without the decimal.

The Colt Police Positive was a favorite of the Keystone Cops era

The Colt Police Positive was a favorite of the Keystone Cops era. And best yet, you could buy it by mail order and have it shipped to your front door.

But the company sold guns aimed at the new automobile market in the 1900s as well, preventing early carjackings for the EDC gent of the Jazz era

But the company sold guns aimed at the new automobile market in the 1900s as well, preventing early carjackings for the EDC gent of the Jazz era

Then came home defense

Then came home defense

And even overseas sales, as shown in the British ad from the 1900s showing off the Colt's "Rapididity" good luck buying a semi-auto handgun in England today

And even overseas sales, as shown in the British ad from the 1900s showing off the Colt’s “Rapidity” good luck buying a semi-auto handgun in England today!

Tsarist Russia was big on German imported semi-autos, as shown by these Mauser P-1910s complete with WESPI tactical lights. Surefire be damned.

Tsarist Russia was big on German imported semi-autos, as shown by these Mauser 1910s complete with WESPI tactical lights. Surefire be damned.

The Russians liked Lugers as well, and DWM wasn't finicky about who they sold to

The Russians liked Lugers as well, and DWM wasn’t finicky about who they sold to

Ad for the Remington Model 12 Pump Action Rifle from 1909. Big Green has always played up the family angle.

Ad for the Remington Model 12 Pump Action Rifle from 1909. Big Green has always played up the family angle.

Such as in this 1951 870 ad showing it side by side with the 11-48 note the similarity in the two...

Such as in this 1951 870 ad showing it side by side with the 11-48 note the similarity in the two…

This is how likely you are to get a 1954 Colt Woodsman for $49 today

This is how likely you are to get a 1954 Colt Woodsman for $69 today

Speaking of Colt, they often marketed the "evil and made for the military only" AR-15 as a hunting and sporting rifle, as seen in the April 1964 American Rifleman ad (we have the original if anyone doubts the authenticity of this)

Speaking of Colt, they often marketed the “evil and made for the military only” AR-15 as a hunting and sporting rifle, as seen in the April 1964 American Rifleman ad (we have the original if anyone doubts the authenticity of this)

Also, see this AR-15A2 ad from 1984, when it was competing with the Ruger Ranch Rifle

Also, see this AR-15A2 Sporter II ad from 1985, when it was competing with the Ruger Ranch Rifle as a gun for use on the farm. This gun had replaced the vaunted SP-1 in Colt’s line the year before.

Remember back when you could buy working .55 caliber Boys Anti-tank rifles

Remember back when you could buy working .55 caliber Boys Anti-tank rifles from this 1960 American Rifleman ad.

And German Slothurns as in this 1958 ad. Check that price! You couldn't smell a Slothurn for that these days

And German Slothurns as in this 1958 ad. Check that price! You couldn’t smell a Slothurn for that these days. And read carefully– this was for sale in CALIFORNIA! You could put it on LAYAWAY!

How about this 1960 ad for M1 Carbines

How about this 1960 ad for (Alpine of California) M1 Carbines

Even jumping into the 1980s...look at this Beretta splay

Even jumping into the 1980s…look at this Beretta splay

Or the forgotten Beretta 86

Or the forgotten Beretta 86 coming at you right from 1993.

And who wouldn't eat there hat for a Belgian made FNC for $599?

And who wouldn’t eat there hat for a Belgian made FNC for $599?

We’ll let you know when we finish the time machine.

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Guns

How Facebook Plans To Catch Gun Sellers

The social media giant plans to lean on its 1.6 billion users to report gun sales, the company says. Although Facebook says it has banned sales of firearms on the service, it is relying on its giant user base to monitor the social network for violations of its new policy. On Friday, the company announced its new policy, which will ban the direct sales of guns on Facebook and Instagram. Although Facebook has a large community standards team, it has no plans to use that team to enforce the new policy. “Enforcement would work the same as everything else on Facebook,” a company spokesperson told Fast Company today. “We rely on our community of 1.6 billion people to report anything they believe violates our community standards. We review all reports and take action if there is something that is in violation.”

On Friday, Facebook head of product policy Monika Bickert said in a statement, “Over the last two years, more and more people have been using Facebook to discover products and to buy and sell things to one another. We are continuing to develop, test, and launch new products to make this experience even better for people, and are updating our regulated goods policies to reflect this evolution.”

Despite the new policy, it will still be possible to advertise gun sales on Facebook. According to Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, the policy will only govern actual offers of firearms for sale on Facebook and Instagram.

“In this country, we know that 40% of gun sales are through unlicensed dealers, without background checks,” Watts told Fast Company last week, adding that licensed dealers, such as Dick’s Sporting Goods, would still be allowed to advertise guns on Facebook. She pointed out, however, that “licensed dealers don’t sell on Facebook.”

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Guns

U.S. Survival AR-7 Rifle. Don’t Leave Civilization Without One

Since 1959 the venerable AR-7 has been the choice of U.S. Air Force pilots who need a small-caliber rifle they can count on should they have to punch out over a remote area. Through the years the AR-7’s reputation for portability, ease of operation and reliability has carried over to the civilian world. Today it’s a favorite of bush pilots, backpackers and backcountry adventurers who, like their Air Force counterparts, need a rifle that’s easy to carry yet has the accuracy to reliably take down small game.
US Survival open

Like the original Henry U.S. Survival Rifle, this innovative, semi-automatic model is lightweight (3.5 lbs.) and highly portable. At just 16.5″ long, when all the components are stowed, it easily fits into the cargo area of a plane, boat or in a backpack. It’s chambered in .22 LR so you can carry a large quantity of ammunition without adding much weight to your gear.

US Survival xray

When disassembled the pieces fit inside the impact-resistant, water resistant stock. Assembly is as easy as attaching the receiver to the stock, inserting the barrel, and screwing on the nut. In a few seconds, without any tools, the Henry U.S. Survival AR-7 is ready for action. It comes standard with a sturdy steel barrel covered in tough ABS plastic that’s coated with Teflon™ for complete protection against corrosion. It’s engineered for perfect balance and the ability to maintain its tack-driving accuracy, even after thousands of rounds.

Survival Marooned

The receiver is also coated with Teflon™ for superior weatherproofing and waterproof protection, even in harsh saltwater environments. The updated receiver is grooved, making it easy to top off with your favorite optics.

The Henry U.S. Survival AR-7 is available in two finishes; Black and Mossy Oak Break-Up Camo Pattern.  All models are equipped with an adjustable rear sight and a blade front sight.

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1395195264_chiappa-x-caliber-1
HOW ABOUT A SURVIVAL SHOTGUN THAT SHOOTS 12 CALIBERS AND FITS IN YOUR BUG OUT BAG. RIFLE SURVIVAL PART 1.

Guns

Check Out this Ultra Compact 12 Gauge You Can Buy with NO Extra Paperwork

The shotgun, thankfully, doesn’t get much of the spotlight from the mainstream media. It’s always handguns and the AR-15 that steals the spotlight, but I am ok with that. If the shotgun was the topic of discussion, then the the gun control advocates would likely be coming after it just as much. The DT-12 compact 12 gauge with a short 8.5″ barrel can be purchased without filing any NFA paperwork.

That’s right, this little beauty is completely legal according to the ATF, although New York and California have restrictions for this weapon. As long as you’re living in any of the other great 48, you’re good to go. See what it can do in the video below.

This is a very impressive gun, though I’m not sure it can be categorized as a shotgun, frankly I don’t care what it’s classified as, I want one.

HOW ABOUT A SURVIVAL SHOTGUN THAT SHOOTS 12 CALIBERS AND FITS IN YOUR BUG OUT BAG.

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Guns

All new 12 gauge “Juicer” slug in action for the first time

TAOFLEDERMAUS is back with another impressive custom shotgun round. The fan named “juicer” slug get’s its name for the fluted design similar to an orange juicer. It doesn’t seem to tumble but it’s flight trajectory is anything but stable. Unfortunately this round only looks cool. Watch it corkscrew through the air as it spirals around the target. When it does connect however, the impact is awesome!I had not originally intended to post this video but after seeing it begin to make a semi-regular appearance on social media, I changed my mind. Its appearance was accompanied with the words “Gotta get me some of these!” rather frequently, a statement withdrawn on more than one occasion after the original poster actually viewed the video. So what is making the rounds on social media in the gun world now? It’s the Juicer, and it’s a shotgun slug courtesy of none other than Taofledermaus.

Taofledermaus posting his Juicer video on November 24th and although I noticed it while it was fairly new it didn’t appear in my news feed on Facebook until more than a week had passed. The Juicers were, in the words of Taofledermaus himself: “…some custom CNC’d bi-metal slugs that Tim from Tactical G-Code made on his crazy robot machine. On Facebook it was decided that these would be called “Juicer” slugs.These were 1oz. in weight and had 5 points.”

There have been some unique shotgun loads in Taofledermaus’ history from some with an attempt at stabilization using Q-Tips to others filled with nails – and then there was the one containing a 5.56round. We all understand the desire to either shoot fun things or shoot things with fun rounds, so it’s no wonder this particular YouTube channel is so popular. Even so I often feel compelled to add the “kids, don’t try this at home” disclaimer. (Have you seen the car-advice memes floating around Facebook? Do they seem like obvious jokes? Well, some people have actually taken that advice to heart, which is why we have disclaimers even when it seems obvious.)

They quite literally resemble a fruit juicer, so the name is apt. Do they work? You’ll have to watch the video to find out.

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Guns

New iPhone app maps concealed carry permit holders

A new mobile app for iPhone called Halos brings concealed carriers together on a virtual map with the goal of creating safer communities. The app, launched in late June on iTunes, allows concealed carry permit holders to broadcast their legal carry status to other users. Displayed on a map, it’s a virtual networking of good guys using location based smartphone technology. While exact locations are kept under wraps by buffer zones of 25 to 50 yards, an update scheduled for early next week will alter that to 50 to 100 yards. These buffer zones are an approximation of location and aim to keep app users safe by not pinpointing where they are. Also included as a safety measures are the use of dark zones — regions where the app will never broadcast. Designed for home and work, these settings give a level of anonymity when needed to protect concealed carry permit holders. Though limited to iPhone users right now, Android fans should see the app in Google Play within the next 60 days. Over 500 permit holders have logged on to check out the new tech; but others are noticeably hesitant to jump on board. Notoriously skeptical 2A supporters point to the app as a potential ploy by the government to track the locations and interactions of legal gun owners. Cook told Guns.com, he gets the concern.

“If I was looking at this app I would have many of the same knee-jerk reactions,” he said in a phone interview.

He reassured Guns.com that the app is not about watching where people go, but rather seeing if where they go is safe.Halos app concealed carry iphone

“I saw the world changing after Paris and San Bernardino and I thought I needed to be part of the solution and not just a bystander,” Cook said. “Networking the good guys takes the value of one permit holder and leverages that. It’s a multiplier effect. We can do a lot more good.”

The U.S. has an estimated 12.8 million legal concealed carry permit holders, according to data published in 2015 by pro-gun research group Crime Prevention Research Center. Using this sheer volume of concealed carry holders in a positive manner, developers of Halos hope concealed carriers step out of the shrouds of self-interest and protection and into a community of other sheepdogs watching out for each other.

“If a million or 5 million or 10 million of us are loosely networked graphically on maps, what effect do you think that would have on criminals and terrorists?” Cook asked. “What effect would that have on our community knowing where safe areas are or are not. Would we still feel like we are operating in the shadows for ourselves or would that promote some sort of community obligation?”

Early adoption into this new tech is rewarded. The first 100 users of Halos in each state get a free subscription, while users after that pay $1.99 per year. Free slots are still available in some states.

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