Guns

MSM PROMOTING ‘GUN CONFISCATION ORDERS’ AS SOLUTION TO MASS SHOOTINGS

In what many saw coming a mile away in the aftermath of both the Las Vegas Massacre and the Texas Church mass shooting, liberals in the government, with the help of their mainstream media allies, are now pushing what amounts to plans for gun confiscation, outside of normal law, for Americans across the country.

The new push for gun control from the left comes courtesy of ABC News which recently published a piece promoting the use of an Extreme Risk Protection Order (ERPO) that many believe is nothing more than a thinly veiled confiscation plan that would allow a judge to “issue an ex parte order” for the direct confiscation of an American citizens firearms.

Unbelievably, the order can actually be issued without the firearm owner even being present, which would in turn end with police at the citizens door demanding he hand over his weapons or face violence from the state.

ABC’s Andy Fies, on the other hand, apparently wants Americans to see the orders differently, painting a more friendly picture of the ERPO’s while quoting two different left-wing gun control groups as seemingly unbiased experts on gun violence.

As of now, only Washington, California, Connecticut and most recently Oregon have ERPO laws (while Indiana and Texas have modified risk warrant statutes). Over the past year, however, spurred by a string of mass shootings beginning with the Pulse Nightclub attack that killed 49 in June 2016, legislatures in 19 states and Washington, D.C., have taken up 32 separate ERPO bills for consideration, according to Everytown for Gun Safety, a nonprofit organization that advocates for gun control.

Everytown’s deputy legal director, William Rosen, told ABC News that list will grow. “We expect to see at least as much interest in 2018,” he said.

“There is a growing consensus,” added Lauren Alfred of the gun violence prevention group Sandy Hook Promise, “that this is the first step we should be taking when we are talking about people who are at risk of hurting themselves or others.”

Current laws barring gun ownership are limited. Generally, a person with a long history of mental health issues can still legally buy or possess firearms if they don’t fall into specific statutory categories such as having been adjudicated mentally ill or under a domestic violence restraining order. But, as was the case with Texas church gunman Devin Kelley, even these restrictions may not work if the person’s troubled past is not recorded on a background registry.

With an ERPO, however, if family members or police can show a gun owner to be an imminent danger to themselves or others, they can force the person to surrender their weapon(s).

Keep in mind that Everytown for Gun Safety is a Michael Bloomberg funded, left-wing gun control group that was created as part of a rebranding effort by the billionaire gun grabber after his previous group, Mayors Against Illegal Guns, was outed by multiple former members as actually pushing an agenda of full-scale gun confiscation.

The Extreme Risk Protection Orders scheme seems to be nothing more than another attempt at slowly eroding the right of lawful Americans to own firearms.

As AWR Hawkins reported in an April 2017 article about a similar law being pushed in Oregon, “Oregon state Sen. Brian Boquist (R-Dallas) is pushing a confiscation bill that would broaden the number of prohibited gun purchasers as well as require certain individuals to hand over any guns in their possession.”

At the time, gun rights activist and NRA member Keely Hopkins rightfully described the law as an attempt to remove your Second Amendment rights by using a third-party who would need little evidence to declare you unfit to own a firearm. (Imagine a vengeful ex-wife/husband)

“This bill allows for a protective order to remove your Second Amendment rights, not because of a criminal conviction, but based on third-party allegations using an evidentiary standard that falls far below what’s normally required for the removing of fundamental rights.”

It is also important to note that gun control advocates and the mainstream media are using The Las Vegas Massacre, which the authorities are openly lying about (there were at least 7 different shooters) as a pretext to further take away Americans right to bear arms. This is, and has always been, the modus operandi of the power elite.

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Guns

Assault Weapons Not Protected by Second Amendment, Federal Appeals Court Rules

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Maryland’s ban on 45 kinds of assault weapons and its 10-round limit on gun magazines were upheld Tuesday by a federal appeals court in a decision that met with a strongly worded dissent.

In a 10-4 ruling, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, said the guns banned under Maryland’s law aren’t protected by the Second Amendment.

“Put simply, we have no power to extend Second Amendment protections to weapons of war,” Judge Robert King wrote for the court, adding that the Supreme Court’s decision in District of Columbia v. Heller explicitly excluded such coverage.

Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, who led the push for the law in 2013 as a state senator, said it’s “unthinkable that these weapons of war, weapons that caused the carnage in Newtown and in other communities across the country, would be protected by the Second Amendment.”

Image: AR-15 rifles build by DSA Inc.
AR-15 rifles. Scott Olson / Getty Images

“It’s a very strong opinion, and it has national significance, both because it’s en-banc and for the strength of its decision,” Frosh said, noting that all of the court’s judges participated.

Judge William Traxler issued a dissent. By concluding the Second Amendment doesn’t even apply, Traxler wrote, the majority “has gone to greater lengths than any other court to eviscerate the constitutionally guaranteed right to keep and bear arms.” He also wrote that the court did not apply a strict enough review on the constitutionality of the law.

“For a law-abiding citizen who, for whatever reason, chooses to protect his home with a semi-automatic rifle instead of a semi-automatic handgun, Maryland’s law clearly imposes a significant burden on the exercise of the right to arm oneself at home, and it should at least be subject to strict scrutiny review before it is allowed to stand,” Traxler wrote.

National Rifle Association spokeswoman Jennifer Baker said, “It is absurd to hold that the most popular rifle in America is not a protected ‘arm’ under the Second Amendment.” She added that the majority opinion “clearly ignores the Supreme Court’s guidance from District of Columbia v. Heller that the Second Amendment protects arms that are ‘in common use at the time for lawful purposes like self-defense.'”

The NRA estimates there are 5 million to 10 million AR-15s — one of the weapons banned under Maryland’s law — in circulation in the United States for lawful purposes. Asked about an appeal, Baker said the NRA is exploring all options.

 

 

But Elizabeth Banach, executive director of Marylanders to Prevent Gun Violence, said the decision is “overwhelming proof that reasonable measures to prevent gun violence are constitutional.”

“Maryland’s law needs to become a national model of evidence-based policies that will reduce gun violence,” Banach wrote in a statement.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake upheld the ban in 2015, but a divided three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year that she didn’t apply the proper legal standard. The panel sent the case back to Blake and ordered her to apply “strict scrutiny,” a more rigorous test of a law’s constitutionality. The state appealed to the full appeals court.

Maryland passed the sweeping gun-control measure after the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre that killed 20 children and six educators in Connecticut. King mentioned the massacre at the start of the ruling.

“Both before and after Newtown, similar military-style rifles and detachable magazines have been used to perpetrate mass shootings in places whose names have become synonymous with the slaughters that occurred there,” King wrote. He listed the 2012 shootings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado; the December 2015 shootings in San Bernardino, California; and the shootings last year at an Orlando, Florida, nightclub, where 49 people were killed and 53 injured.

King also noted that enacting the law is “precisely the type of judgment that legislatures are allowed to make without second-guessing by a court.”

“Simply put, the State has shown all that is required: a reasonable, if not perfect, fit between the (Firearms Safety Act) and Maryland’s interest in protecting public safety,” King wrote.

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Guns

House Passes Bill Mandating Transfer of All US Army M1911 Handguns to the CMP

The US House of Representatives recently has passed their version of the 2018 NDAA (National Defense Authorization Act ). Within, it included a provision that will mandate the release of all the M1911 handguns that are currently in US Army inventory to the CMP (the Civilian Marksmanship Program), for a further distribution to eligible US civilians. This new bill would overwrite the 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, which allowed for the release of 10,000 of the pistols but, fortunately, did not mandate it. Read more

Guns

Man shoots wife at point-blank range during marketing stunt. This is how it ended.

Colombian entrepreneur Miguel Caballero, designer of a bulletproof clothing line, demonstrated the viability of his product on an unlikely target: his wife — and this wasn’t the first time he’d done it.

Caballero’s MC Armor clothing line recently expanded its market to the U.S., and to demonstrate his product’s design, Caballero and his wife, Carolina Ballesteros, filmed an attention-grabbing promotional video.

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Guns

Hussein’s Gun May Go on Display at Bush Library

Many American presidents have kept prized possessions within reach during their White House years. Franklin D. Roosevelt cherished a 19th century ship model of the U.S.S. Constitution. One of Dwight D. Eisenhower’s favorite gifts was an engraved Steuben glass bowl from his cabinet. And sitting on John F. Kennedy’s desk in the Oval Office was a paperweight made from a coconut shell he had carved with a distress message after his PT-109 was sunk during World War II.

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Guns

“Offensive” coffee commercial savagely mocks the liberal logic behind gun control

Veteran, comedian, internet star, and entrepreneur Mat Best is back with another great commercial for Black Rifle Coffee.

If you love coffee as much as the 2nd Amendment and don’t mind offending gun control advocates, you’ll love this video.

Evan Hafer, an Army Special Forces veteran and Black Rifle Coffee CEO, started roasting coffee in Colorado as a side job between deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. Now he plans to expand his company to bring more jobs to the 2.5 million post-9/11 veterans.

With the help of other veterans like Mat Best, Black Rifle Coffee has been spreading the word about their brand through funny videos like the one below.

WARNING: If you’ve ever needed to use a safe space for a good cry, you’re going to have a bad time.

Guns

Guns kill nearly 1,300 US children each year, study says

Rambunctious third-graders filled a classroom in Seattle on a crisp autumn day. One of the students dropped his backpack, and horror ensued.

That student had brought a parent’s gun to school and was carrying it in his backpack. When the bag fell to the floor, the impact caused the gun to fire, sending a bullet straight into another student’s abdomen, said Dr. Thomas Weiser, a trauma surgeon at Stanford University Medical Center.
Weiser treated that third-grader’s gunshot wound while completing a fellowship at Harborview Medical Center in Washington in 2011.

When the student arrived at the hospital, awake and alert with a bullet hole oozing blood just below her heart, she had a jarring expression of confusion in her brown eyes, Weiser said.
“She kind of had this look in her eyes. It wasn’t pain. … There was obviously a little fear … but I remember, my impression was (she had) this question: Why is this happening? She couldn’t really process everything that was happening to her and around her,” Weiser said. “She survived, but she had a terrible injury.”
Now, a study based on data from 2012 to 2014 suggests that, on average, 5,790 children in the United States receive medical treatment in an emergency room each year for a gun-related injury. About 21% of those injuries are unintentional, similar to the third-grader’s case.
From 2012 to 2014, on average, 1,297 children died annually from a gun-related injury in the US, according to the study, published in the journal Pediatrics on Monday.
The study also revealed which states in the US saw most of those deaths among children and which children may be most at risk for a gun-related injury.
“When you start putting numbers like that to real lives, real people every day who are injured by firearms … it confirms a statistic we already know a lot about,” said Weiser, who was not involved in the study.
Doctors also emphasize that there are methods available to safely secure and store firearms, away from children, and they recommend that parents employ those methods when keeping guns in the home.

Boys and guns

The researchers examined national data on fatal firearm injuries from death certificates in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Vital Statistics System database.
For nonfatal firearm injuries, the researchers examined data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission’s National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database.
Specifically looking at deaths and injuries among children up to age 17, the researchers analyzed the data for trends that may have occurred from 2002 to 2014.
They found that, among the deaths, 53% were homicides, 38% were suicides, 6% were unintentional, and 3% were related to law enforcement or undetermined. Among the injuries, 71% were assault, 21% were unintentional, 5% were related to law enforcement or undetermined, and about 3% were from self-harm.
As for unintentional firearm injuries, Weiser said, the third-grade girl he treated was not the only accidental gunshot wound he saw in a child. Another such injury involved a boy around 9 who was given a handgun for his birthday.
“He shot his 6-year-old brother, playing in the backyard,” Weiser said, adding that the new study findings show that boys are much more likely to be injured by firearms than girls.
Boys accounted for 82% of all child firearm deaths and about 84% of all nonfatal firearm injuries that were medically treated in the study. African-American children had the highest rates of firearm homicide, and white and Native American children had the highest rates of firearm suicide.
Those patterns of gun-related deaths appeared to fluctuate by state.

Where children die by firearms

While the District of Columbia and Louisiana had the highest rates of child firearm deaths, several states — including Delaware, Hawaii, Maine and New Hampshire — had 20 or fewer deaths, the researchers found.
The highest rates for homicides were concentrated in the South; across the Midwestern states of Illinois, Missouri, Michigan and Ohio; and in California, Nevada, Connecticut, Maryland and Pennsylvania.
For suicides, which were calculated only for children 10 and older in the study, the researchers found that incidents were widely dispersed across the country. However, separate research has found rates of suicide by firearm to be disproportionately higher in rural compared with urban areas.
For Dr. David Wesson, a pediatric surgeon at Texas Children’s Hospital who was not involved in the new study, the rates of suicide that emerged in the data were among the most disturbing trends.
“It’s important for parents to be aware of their children’s state of mind and if they’re depressed,” he said. “Just having access to a gun in a situation where you’re upset with what’s going on at school or with your friends, or your own internal emotional state, it unfortunately can lead to suicide. It’s very important for parents to be aware of that, particularly if they have guns in the home.”
Overall, the researchers found that older children, those 13 to 17, had a rate of fatal firearm injury that was more than 12 times higher than the rate for children 12 and younger.
“These are preventable injuries that have a major public health impact on early death and disability among children,” said Katherine Fowler, a behavioral scientist for the CDC and lead author of the study.
Yet she added that some promising trends also appeared in the data.
“Although firearm homicides of children significantly increased between 2002 and 2007, they significantly declined between 2007 and 2014,” Fowler said.
“This is a very encouraging trend. There are many evidence-based programs and policies that have been found to be effective in preventing youth violence, including youth homicide,” she said. “Preventing such injuries and ensuring that all children have safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments remains one of our most important priorities.”
Fowler pointed to a collection of strategies that the CDC has developed to help states and communities build effective programs, policies and practices around violence prevention.
“Firearm-related injuries contribute substantially each year to premature death, illness and disability of children. These injuries are preventable,” she said.
The researchers noted in the study that their findings are subject to limitations.
For instance, unintentional firearm deaths may be significantly underreported, which skews data, and firearm injuries that were not treated in a hospital or similar health care setting were not included.
All in all, the new findings seem to fall in line with previous research on gun violence among children in America.

‘It really is a complex disease’

Based on the findings, the data suggest that about 19 children a day die from or are medically treated in an emergency room for a gunshot wound.
Previously, it was estimated that on average 16 children a day are hospitalized due to firearm injuries in the US, according to research presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meetingin San Francisco in May.
Of 23 high-income countries, 91% of children killed by firearms in 2010 were from the US, according to a study published in The American Journal of Medicinelast year.
Dr. Stephen Hargarten, professor and chairman of emergency medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin, likened gun violence in America to a disease.
“The fact that these children are injured, they are cared for by surgeons, within the health care system, they have fractures, they have brain injuries, they have lacerations to their body and so forth, so that’s the biology of this disease,” said Hargarten, who was not involved in the new study.
He added that the agent of the disease would be the kinetic energy from a bullet that is firing out of a gun.
“The psychosocial components are related to the circumstances of these events, of the domestic violence disputes that result in children getting injured or killed, the psychological issues surrounding the transitions of thinking or feeling suicidal and ending their life,” Hargarten said.
“Then the social aspects of this are related to the environmental circumstances,” he said. “And the social constructs of companies that make these products that are available to children, that can be used very easily by children, and so it really is a complex disease.”
There are ways in which guns can be made not so easily accessible to children, Hargarten said.

Safety tips for parents with guns

A lock box or gun safe can be an effective way to keep a gun away from children, Hargarten said. Or stimulating the marketplace for smart guns designed to unlock only for an authorized user could be promising, he said.
“That would have an impact in the home — where, again, properly secure it — but even if the child or young adult does find the gun, they can’t use it because they’re not authorized to access the gun,” Hargarten said.
Being mindful of who is nearby when a gun is being handled in the home can also play a role in injury prevention, said Wesson, the pediatric surgeon in Texas.
In his 35-year career, the first infant with a gunshot wound whom Wesson ever treated was accidentally shot while sitting in a baby chair at the kitchen table. The infant was only about 4 weeks old, he said.
“The father was sitting there, on a kitchen chair, and was doing something with his rifle. He said he was cleaning it,” Wesson said.
Suddenly, the rifle accidentally fired in the baby’s direction.
“Fortunately, it was a low-power rifle. It just hit the baby in the abdomen and made a big opening in the abdomen,” he said, adding that the baby survived.
“Everything was healed up in the end, but it was a devastating and tragic event, and of course you can imagine how the parents felt about it. They were devastated, and that’s the typical story. You don’t expect it to happen, or it was an accident,” he said. “Health care centers and trauma centers and people participating in trauma care can offer a lot to injured people, but the rational approach is to prevent these injuries from occurring in the first place, whether it’s unintentional or intentional.”
Dr. Eliot Nelson, a pediatrician at the University of Vermont Medical Center, wrote an editorial that accompanied the new study in the journal Pediatrics.
Recommending to remove guns completely from a home can be off-putting for parents who might keep guns for hunting or protection, he said.
Rather, “we can point out that parents may underestimate kids’ propensity to handle guns unsafely, even when they’ve been taught,” Nelson wrote.
“Excellent information can be shared on safe storage and locking methods that still allow quick access to a handgun if it were ever needed,” he wrote. “And finally, given the impulsivity, risk-taking, and unpredictability of adolescence, we should promote safe storage as a routine measure.”
Weiser, the Stanford trauma surgeon, hopes there will be fewer gun-related injuries and deaths among children in the future. He compared gun violence to an earthquake.
“When you build a city in an earthquake zone, you make the buildings as earthquake-proof as possible. You try to build in as much possible safety as you can,” Weiser said. “And so, why we can’t make safer guns and make safer laws is beyond me.”
Guns

Man who shot Ohio judge was father of teen convicted of rape

COLUMBUS, Ohio — A man who shot and wounded a judge outside a county courthouse before being gunned down by a probation officer was the father of a high school football player who was convicted of rape in 2013, authorities said Monday.

Jefferson County Judge Joseph Bruzzese Jr. was shot Monday morning near the courthouse in Steubenville, across the Ohio River from West Virginia’s northern panhandle and just west of Pittsburgh.

Evidence markers were placed on the street and the sidewalk near the Jefferson County Courthouse in Steubenville, Ohio.

Evidence markers were placed on the street and the sidewalk near the Jefferson County Courthouse in Steubenville, Ohio.

 

Authorities identified the gunman as Nathaniel “Nate” Richmond, the father of Ma’Lik Richmond. Ma’Lik, then 17, served about 10 months in a juvenile lockup after being convicted with another Steubenville High School football player of raping a 16-year-old girl during an alcohol-fueled party in 2012.

The case brought international attention to the eastern Ohio city of 18,000 residents and led to allegations of a cover-up to protect the football team.

Investigators are looking for a motive in the shooting and haven’t found a connection to the rape case, prosecutor Jane Hanlin said.

A visiting judge from Hamilton County, where Cincinnati is located, handled the majority of the rape case.

Records show Bruzzese was overseeing a wrongful-death lawsuit that Nate Richmond filed in April against the Jefferson County Metropolitan Housing Authority. A hearing on a motion by the housing authority to dismiss punitive damages claims was set for Aug. 28. Messages were left for Richmond’s attorneys.

Richmond had a few traffic violations in the past couple of years, and several years ago he was arrested on various domestic violence and assault charges, court records show.

The prosecutor said Bruzzese was shoved to the ground during Monday’s attack. Courthouse video shows the judge and Richmond firing about five times each, Jefferson County Sheriff Fred Abdalla said.

Bruzzese was talking after being wounded, Steubenville City Manager James Mavromatis told WTOV-TV. The judge was flown to a Pittsburgh-area hospital. Ohio Governor John Kasich said he was told the judge would survive.

The attack had to be intentional because people know about the reserved spots where judges park, one of Bruzzese’s judicial colleagues said.

Judge Joseph Corabi said he and the county’s two other judges park in reserved spots next to the courthouse. Judges then walk a few feet down what’s known as Courthouse Alley to a side entrance to the building, said Corabi, the Jefferson County juvenile and probate court judge.

“Everybody knows who parks there. That’s why it’s not an accident what happened. He was clearly an intended target,” Corabi said.

Ma’Lik Richmond, now 21, is currently on the Youngstown State football team but isn’t allowed to play in any games, the school said this month.

News of his participation drew a wave of criticism in the university community recently, and a petition was started to keep him from playing.

Corabi said Bruzzese is known as an avid hunter. He called him fair, hardworking, well-liked and “a tough son of a gun.”

“He is very intelligent, and he can cut to the chase,” Corabi said. “He spots issues, and he resolves the issues.”

Bruzzese hears general and domestic relations cases as one of two judges serving in Jefferson County Common Pleas Court.

Bruzzese has served on that court since 1997. He was most recently re-elected in 2014 for another six-year term.

He had likely arrived early to review his usual Monday morning batch of legal motions, Corabi said.

The shooting suspect’s body could be seen lying next to a car at the drive-thru of a neighboring bank. Police said a man who was in the car with him was taken into custody.

The courthouse was closed for the day as local and state authorities helped secure the scene. Jefferson County Commissioner Thomas Graham told WTOV some courthouse workers witnessed the “tragic situation” and people would need time to process what happened.

The state crime lab will help investigate the shooting, Attorney General Mike DeWine said.

The chief justice of the Ohio Supreme Court, Maureen O’Connor, called the attack a “cowardly ambush” and urged court personnel, especially judges, to take extra precautions.

“Violence against judges represents an attack on the Rule of Law, the foundation of our country,” O’Connor said.

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